April 11, 2021

Do Maps Show Increased Shipping Traffic Around Cape of Good Hope Due to Suez Blockage?

The southern route includes about 10 to 15 days to a vessels journey, increases its risk of piracy, and brings it to a location historically referred to, due to unstable seas, as “The Graveyard of Ships.” While lots of boats, about 300 on both sides of the canal at the time of this reporting, are waiting it out, delivering business have actually diverted some vessels to take the old-fashioned method around Africa..

While the map, from the website VesselFinder, precisely reveals shipping traffic around the Cape of Good Hope after the Suez event, it is unlikely that it reveals a boost in shipping traffic as a result of that event. For all its historical lore, the southern path around Africa is still widely used for shipping.

On March 26, for example, the shipping leviathan MSC revealed it was rerouting 11 container ships around the Cape. A minimum of 7 liquid gas vessels were also routed around the Cape, according to the New York Times. “If the Ever Given is not refloated at high tide on Sunday [March 28, 2021], a lot more detours are expected,” the American Shipper, a trade publication, reported.

Since ships have actually been diverted around the southern pointer of Africa as an outcome of the Ever Given obstruction, but since maps professing to show this phenomenon most likely show routine traffic, the claim is a “Mixture.”.

On March 23, 2021, among the worlds largest shipping vessels got stuck in the Suez Canal, a critical maritime artery that handles about 12% of worldwide trade yearly. Five days later on, at the time of this reporting, the clog remains– and it is requiring shipping business to consider the cost versus benefit of either waiting an indeterminate quantity of time for the canal to reopen or rerouting their operation around Africas Cape of Good Hope.

To illustrate this news, some on Twitter have actually shared images from vessel tracking apps that show a line of boats taking a trip around the Cape of Good Hope. This is a viral tweet from March 25, 2021 conjuring up the flamboyant nature of the southern path around Africa:.

On March 26, for example, the shipping leviathan MSC announced it was rerouting 11 container ships around the Cape. While the map, from the site VesselFinder, accurately shows shipping traffic around the Cape of Good Hope after the Suez occurrence, it is unlikely that it reveals a boost in shipping traffic as a result of that occurrence. For all its historic tradition, the southern route around Africa is still extensively utilized for shipping.